gin news

The Ruddles Report: January

posted in: Gin and Juniper, Gin news | 0

Notes from a gin dog

In the latest edition of the Ruddles gin report, our faithful gin dog has been sniffing out some news that you might find ginteresting. Winter is not his favourite time of year and lockdown hasn’t helped. He’s been keeping himself busy scouring the world’s media for the gin stories you might have missed. And here’s what he’s come up with! 

What goes around comes around

Apparently, there’s a Japanese brewery that has found a way to recycle beer that’s going to waste in bars during lockdown and turning it into a pretty decent craft gin. Restaurants sell their unsold beer to Kiuchi’s facility in Tokyo. There, it is distilled into gin, bottled and sent back to the restaurants in question. A great idea. Who knows, it might even catch on on this side of the world.  In fact, recycling has been going great guns over the last 12 months.

Recyclable gin pouches and aluminium tops

Scotland’s Rock Rose are now offering gin refills in recyclable pouches to cut down on their environmental impact.  And it looks like several other distilleries are following their lead. Even Beefeater are having a go at it with their latest move towards sustainable packaging. Their new gin bottles are made with recyclable glass. Their PVC labels have returned to the old fashioned paper ones and their plastic tops are now made of recyclable aluminium. Beefeater estimate that this will reduce their plastic waste by 410 tonnes every year. Yes, please!

Ginfusions for all (and a Philippines love affair!)

And as the gin revolution continues apace, more and more people are starting to infuse their own gins. Not surprising in the midst of all this lockdown boredom! Here’s a great little article that gives you a handy guide to infusing your gin. It’s also got some excellent recipe ideas for you to make at home. Just follow the instructions. Seemples! If you were ever wondering which country drinks the most gin, you might be surprised to learn that it’s the Phillipines.  Check out this interesting article about how an English drink became popular amongst Spanish settlers and the Filipino elite and how their love affair with gin began. You’ll learn some interesting stuff about Tagay culture as well.

What does the year ahead hold?

As we enter a new year, we have lots of gin things to look forward to, but without a crystal ball it’s hard to know what excitement lies ahead of us. So here’s a little article that tells us about the 6 gin trends that you simply must know about for 2021. It will definitely keep you ahead of the competition in those gin conversations that we know you’re going to have this year.

Gin taster required – apply within

And finally, for any of our North American friends interested in a career change, there’s a distillery looking for full time gin tasters – paid.  If this sounds like the dream job for you, read the full story here. And because Ruddles always likes to end up on a positive note, he’s added an interesting piece on how his favorite drink has become the star of many classic movies. From Breakfast at Tiffany’s to Casablanca and from Casino Royale to The Great Gatsby. We’ll drink to that!

That’s all for this month’s Ruddles gin report – hope you enjoy it.  We’ll sniff out more like this next month, so stay tuned!


Written by Steve (with a little help from Ruddles, the gin dog!)

Don’t forget to follow us on our facebook community page to join in the gin discussion.


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Gin nut

NUT gin: the clue is in the name!

We stumbled across a lovely little gin the other day. It’s from right here in Catalunya and frankly it was too good for us not to share.

Go nuts!

Introducing NUT gin, craft-distilled in the Emporda region of Catalunya nestled between the rugged drama of the Pyrenean mountains and the cooling breezes of the Mediterranean coast. This is an area that is sure to inspire you with its natural beauty. The guys at NUT have created a unique gin in the traditional London Dry style and have infused it with a special blend of locally grown fruits, flowers, herbs and Mediterranean spices. The result is a distinctive tasting gin that really stands out from the crowd. At 45% ABV, NUT gin doesn’t hold back on the alcohol, yet it still delivers a smooth tasting, unusual and delicious gin with a long, smooth orange finish.

Inspired by rugged beauty and local botanicals

Like most Catalans, the team at NUT have a deep respect for beauty and nature. The rich, productive soils here allow flora and fauna to both survive and thrive. So, what is it that makes this London Dry style gin so special?

Only the best ingredients

They only use the best base alcohol, distilled four times. They then infuse it with a delightful combination of locally sourced botanicals, which they macerate for a minimum of 24 hours. These include the required juniper, but also 12 others including coriander, cardamom, angelica root, lemon peel, orange peel, rosemary, thyme, olive leaves and licorice. Then it gets interesting. They’ve added some local ingredients that are not often found in gin and which give it a unique character. The clue is in the name. In a stroke of genius, the guys at NUT have added walnuts and bitter almonds.

Complex, smooth and just a little bit nutty…

So, what does this unusual gin actually taste of? Well, the first impressions on the nose are that it has an elegant intensity. There are strong notes of citrus (in a nod towards its Mediterranean origins). There is also a noticeable herbaceous element. This brings out the best of all the other spices just waiting to be released into your mouth. And finally, there is a smooth, long finish to this gin where you should pick up traces of orange peels for a bittersweet ending.

Good enough to drink alone

All in all this is a great value treat, delivering confidently on all its promises. In fact, this gin is so good that it actually tastes rather nice all on its own. Just pour a measure into a rocks glass over a large ice cube and add a twist of orange peel. And if you’d like even more Mediterranean adventure in your drink, simply swap the orange peel for a sprig of burned rosemary. You could even a little fig for added sweetness.

However, drinking gin neat is not necessarily to everyone’s taste. You’ll be relieved to know that this gin is outstanding in a Mediterranean style G&T and is a great gin if you’re looking to give your cocktails a unique twist.

The perfect pour

This is a Mediterranean gin and we think it should be served in the Mediterranean style. Take a large copa glass and fill it to the top with big ice cubes (the bigger, the better!) Pour in a decent slug of gin (you decide what that means!) Fill it up to the top with a high quality Indian tonic water such as 1724 or a subtly flavoured premium tonic such as Fevertree Mediterranenan. Add a garnish such as a cinammon stick or a fresh orange wedge to bring out the best of the botanicals. You could even add a pinch of nutmeg if you’re feeling really adventurous. Your reward will be a distinctive gin, packed with intense Mediterranean flavours. Take that first sip and prepare to be instantly whisked away to the beautiful heart of Catalunya.

Saludos!


Written by Steve (with a little help from Ruddles, the gin dog!)

Don’t forget to follow us on our facebook community page to join in the gin discussion.


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gin mule

Gin-Gin Mule: a gin cocktail with a kick!

posted in: Cocktails, Gin and Juniper | 0

Many of us will have heard of the legendary Moscow Mule.  It’s a classic cocktail and it’s been around forever.  It is a cocktail made with vodka, spicy ginger beer, and lime juice, garnished with a slice or wedge of lime.  The Moscow Mule is generally served in copper mugs and is one of the simplest and most delicious cocktails ever.
But what does all this have to do with gin, I hear you ask? Well, there is a special variation of this drink for gin lovers and, just like the city it was born in, it was so good, they named it twice.  It’s called (for obvious reasons), the Gin-Gin Mule.

The beautiful “love child” of a Moscow Mule and a Mojito

Invented in New York in the year 2000, this delicious drink is the beautiful love child of a Moscow Mule and a Mojito, so it has good genes! But this is more than just a change of booze.  The subtle difference is that it substitutes gin for vodka and adds the muddled mintiness of a Mojito to create a gorgeous taste and flavour combination that, in my opinion, far exceeds the beauty of its two elderly parents.
Just imagine this – a muddle of sugary mintiness at the bottom, offset by the spiciness and bubbles of a freshly opened bottle of ginger beer (we recommend Fentimans or Fever Tree) with a little citrus tartness to give it a refreshing edge and a big blast of a decent london dry gin such as Beefeater or Bombay Sapphire.

The serve

Traditionally, a Moscow Mule is served in a small, handbeaten  copper mug, but this drink works almost as well in a highball glass or a tumbler.  But the copper mug is better for sure. Not only does it look good but it adds a bit of novelty to your regular drinking approach.  And apparently, drinking from a cold copper mug maintains and even increases the bubbliness of the ginger beer, ensuring that your drink will be sparkling every time.  You can pick up a set of four of these beautiful, hand beaten copper mugs for less than £20 and guarantee that the sparkle will remain right up to the last drop.

The verdict

Wow, Gin-Gin Mule is a great drink and its parents should be proud.  No wonder this quickly became a contemporary classic when it was first introduced to customers at New York’s Pegu Club 20 years ago. Deliciously spicy and citrusy at the same time, the fresh, muddled mint takes it to another level altogether.  We cannot recommend this cocktail highly enough, but make sure you use freshly opened,  high quality ginger beer to make sure the fizz is truly fizzing!

Gin-Gin Mule recipe

Ingredients:

  • 4 mint sprigs
  • 1/2 oz of fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 oz of simple syrup
  • 2 oz gin (Bombay Sapphire)
  • 2 ounces of high quality ginger beer (Fever Tree or Fentimans)
  • Garnish with lime wedges and a sprig of mint

Method:

  1. Muddle the mint leaves in the bottom of the mug/glass using a wooden spoon
  2. Add the lime juice, simple syrup and gin
  3. Stir to combine
  4. Add ice and fill to top with ginger beer.
  5. Stir gently
  6. Wipe the rim of the glass with a lime wedge
  7. Garnish with lime and mint (or a slice of ginger root)

gin mule

Calories per serving: 177

penne with gin

The Italian Job: penne pasta with gin

What could be better on a cold winter’s day than a warming, comforting bowl of pasta to heat you up from the inside? How about a bowl of pasta that has gin as one of its main ingredients? Got your attention, didn’t we!
There can be few more comforting things in the world than a hot, steaming bowl of Italian pasta served up on a cold day.
There’s something about Italian cooking that goes right to your soul. Hearty, robust and simple.
So, we thought we’d share a classic pasta recipe with you that makes use of one of our favourite ingredients: gin.

This is pasta the way your Italian grandmother would make it (if you had one!). The sort of food that sticks to your ribs and feels like a giant hug on a cold day. Plus, this recipe is not only hearty and flavoursome, but it is meat-free, so everyone can enjoy it. A tantalising combination of sweet, fruity tomatoes, wholesome pasta and rich cream, it’s really easy to make and will give you a warm glow from the inside to help you to do battle with the cold weather outside.

Gin versus vodka: you decide

Many of you may have seen Italian recipes that call for vodka as a main ingredient. Vodka Penne is probably the best known example. But Italy is now making better gins than ever before and we think it’s best to leave the vodka to the Russians. Like vodka, gin is a colourless spirit. But unlike vodka, gin has a complexity of flavours that poor old vodka can only aspire to. To start with, gin’s predominant flavour must be juniper, so it already has a big edge in the flavour stakes. This means that you have a solid target to bounce the additional ingredients off – and the results will be surprising and delicious.

You’re 15 minutes from Italian heaven

So, here we go – a delicious, vegetarian pasta dish that you can whip up from scratch in as little as 15 minutes. Made with cream, tomatoes, chili peppers, rosemary (and most importantly, gin). We recommend Malfy Originale as the perfect accompaniment for this dish, but any gin with a strong flavour profile will do. We chose Malfy Originale because it is a classic, dry gin, with eight different botanicals to tease your tastebuds. This gin is robust enough to rise above the competing flavours of this dish and complex enough to add a savoury juniper twist that will elevate this classic Italian dish to another level.

Gin penne pasta recipe

Ingredients:

  • 12 oz (350g) dried pasta
  • 3 tablespoons (45g) butter
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup (125ml) gin (we recommend Malfy)
  • 1 1/4 cups (300g) canned tomatoes
  • 1 cup (250 ml) heavy cream
  • 1 teaspoon of crushed red chili pepper
  • 1 teaspoon chopped, fresh rosemary
  • Salt
  • 1.4 cup (25g) freshly grated parmesan cheese

Method:

  1. Boil water in saucepan along wth 3 tablespoons of salt. Put pasta in and cook until al dente
  2. Melt the butter in a wide pan, large enough for all the pasta. Add the shallot and cook for one minute (until soft).
  3. Add the gin and simmer for three minutes
  4. Add the tomatoes, cream, red chili pepper, rosemary and 1/2 teaspoon of salt
  5. Gently simmer for 10 minutes
  6. When the pasta is done, drain it and add to the pan. Reduce heat to low, add the cheese and stir until pasta is coated wth the sauce.
  7. Serve with extra cheese on top.

Cin-cin!



Written by Steve (with a little help from Ruddles, the gin dog!)

Don’t forget to follow us on our facebook community page to join in the gin discussion.


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gin punch

Gin punch: a giant cocktail served in a bowl

posted in: Cocktails, Gin and Juniper | 0

We all like a cocktail. But 200 years before the term was invented, we had to resort to other creative ways of getting our alcohol fix. In those days, there were no cocktail glasses, fancy recipes or bartender’s tools in those days – so they turned to punch! In its earliest days, in the 18th century, a typical punch would contain ingredients that were considered exotic for the time. Often, these would include fruits that seem normal to us now, but which were extremely rare and expensive three centuries ago.
These included rare treats such as oranges from Asia, fragrant spices from the East and sugar, all the way from the Caribbean, which became the perfect match for the strong flavours of rum and brandy. The trouble was that rum and brandy were very expensive. On the other hand, English gin was increasingly affordable. It wasn’t long before gin became recognised as a better value concoction than some of its contemporary spirits and that was when it entered the mainstream world of punch.

A drink for the middle classes

The relative accessibility and affordability of gin quickly made punch more accessible to the burgeoning English middle classes.
However, strangely enough, the 18th century reveals no published gin punch recipes at all. According to a contemporaneous journal, “a hornful of punch should be administered to cattle in a bid to cure their distemper”. This is a clear indication that in those early days punch was initially considered something of low quality and not of much use to actual humans. However, towards the end of the 18th century, reports of its human medicinal qualities began to appear alongside suggestions that it could help to treat a variety of ailments. Gin Punch was soon believed to be a cure-all for everything from dissolving kidney stones, to curing Berri-Berri. It was also (bizarrely) considered a great way to encourage toxins to leave the body efficiently, in the form of sweat.

1776: the punch revolution

In 1776, at around the same time as the American’s were plotting their revolution, diarist James Boswell wrote (after a particularly good night on the town) that he: “drank rather too much gin punch. It was a new experience to me and I liked it much”.
By the end of the 18th century gin punch had elevated itself from its humble position at the heart of the local gin palace, into something more fitting. This elevation made it suitable for the more sophisticated and rarified atmosphere of London’s gentleman’s clubs. Stalwarts such as the Garrick or Limmer’s Hotel became the places that finally established punch as a popular and respectable, middle class drink. In fact, one of the first gin recipes at the turn of the 18th century, sounds rather nice (but very strong):
two pints of gin, oranges, lemons, orange sugar syrup and white wine.

Punch goes upmarket

A few decades later, London’s Garrick Club added a new twist to its own “house punch” – soda water. The original Garrick Club Punch recipe called for:

half a pint of gin, lemon peel, lemon juice, sugar, maraschino, a pint and a quarter of water and two bottles of iced soda water.

It didn’t take very long for its fame to spread around London and before you know it, punches and punch bowls were popping up everywhere. Over time, these punches evolved into more complex single serve variants which were popularised by Americans in the 1870s. They gave them personal names such as the John Collins and the classic Tom Collins. By the end of the century, punch had been truly established in English culture and English Dry Gin had become a mainstay of many of the best punches. But why is punch served in a punch bowl?

Why is punch served in a bowl?

It’s simple, really. As strong punch loosened inhibitions, it helped reserved Englishmen come out of their shell. It helped them to add a little well-lubricated wit to social gatherings, political discussions and business occasions. Drinking punch was always a fabulous social occasion and gathering around the punch bowl ended up becoming the popular focus for many a high spirited evening, loosening inhibitions and encouraging conviviality, conversation and sharing in a way that had never been seen before.

From simple punch bowl to sophisticated cocktails

These days, punches have fallen out of fashion, but that’s a real shame since these simple-to-make, sociable drinks can be a lot of fun. And they can be deceptively strong. Over the years, people’s tastes evolved once more and the simple punch bowl morphed slowly into the next big alcoholic fad in the 19th century – cocktails. Bartenders began to mix drinks to suit their specific customers and the approach to alcohol became increasingly bespoke and sophisticated. Now, the cocktail is definitely king – of that there is no doubt. But there are still some great gin punches out there – and it would be a great shame to let this fabulously simple tradition die out. Check out our recent article on a classic New Year’s Eve punch. And here’s another variant on the gin punch for when the weather gets a bit better.

Gin Punch recipe

Ingredients:

Method:

  1. Cut and combine all the fruits into a large punchbowl
  2. Add the gin, juice, syrups, creme de framboise (or alternative fruit liqueur) and water
  3. Refrigerate for 4-5 hours
  4. Before serving: add ice, fill to top with cava and stir
  5. Ladle into punch glasses with plenty of fruit (and ice)
  6. Repeat frequently!


Written by Steve (with a little help from Ruddles, the gin dog!)

Don’t forget to follow us on our facebook community page to join in the gin discussion.


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smokey ice cubes

Smoky ice cubes: are they really a thing?

posted in: Cocktails, Gin and Juniper | 0

No smoke without fire?

Smoky ice cubes are indeed a thing. And they’re so easy to make. You could go all out and spend a day preparing a fire, smoking the wood and delicately infusing the ice. Or, you could simply buy a small bottle of liquid smoke and add a few drops to your ice cubes.  Bingo!

This little hack is a gift from us to you – we know you’re busy and who has the time to do this from scratch?  As the ice cubes inevitably melt, your drink becomes infused with a gentle smokiness that can enhance strong, complex cocktails such as a Negroni or a gin Old Fashioned. It’s a little magic trick that will impress your friends. For more inspiration, check out our free Top 10 gin bartending hacks.

Here is a great recipe that will draw out the smoky  flavour from the ice to really lift your cocktail out of the ordinary.

Ingredients:

  • 10-15 smoky ice cubes
  • 1 lime (cut into 8 wedges)
  • 90ml of gin (citrus gins work best)
  • Premium tonic water

Method:

  1. Squeeze the juice of two lime wedges per glass
  2. Fill the glass with the remaining lime wedges and fill to top with smokey ice cubes
  3. Add the gin and top up with tonic
  4. Garnish with  half of the thin lime slice and serve immediately

smokey ice cubes

Relax. Continued

honey falling from a wooden honey dipper

Queen Bee cocktail: a blend of natural honey and citrus to get you buzzing!!

posted in: Cocktails, Gin and Juniper | 0

Looking for a delicious new cocktail to get 2021 off to a great start? Then, look no further. Introducing the Queen Bee cocktail – a beautiful smooth and healthy gin cocktail that is guaranteed to put a smile on your face.

Silky smooth blend of citrus and honey (with a coffee edge)

Mixed from a smooth blend of gin, orange juice and orange blossom honey syrup, this rich, silky drink is stunning with a premium tonic water, but it also works really well with a Fever Tree elderflower tonic water.  Plus, if you’re feeling creative, you can top this off with a coffee bean sugar glass edge for a touch of exotic intrigue.  This gorgeous cocktail delivers a beautiful balance of citrus, floral and pine notes all laid over a sweet underlay of natural honey.  This recipe delivers 2 units of alcohol and around 200Kcal per glass. It also delivers 9.6% ABV – low enough to have a few of these before things get too messy.  We think this could be the perfect cocktail for a healthy  and delicious weekend buzz? Why not knock one up and decide for yourself – it couldn’t be easier!

Queen Bee cocktail recipe

You will need:

  • Serrated knife and chopping board
  • Long, twisted bar spoon
  • Measuring device
  • Hob and pan (to make the syrup)

Ingredients:

Method:

  1. Rub the rim of a copa glass with a freshly cut orange wedge
  2. Roll the glass rim edge through the freshly ground coffee bean and sugar powder
  3. Add the gin, orange juice and honey syrup and swirl glass to mix
  4. Fill the glass with cubed ice and then stir well to chill and mix the ingredients
  5. Slowly pour the mixer down the inside of the glass
  6. Gently fold the mixture with a bar spoon to ensure that all ingredients are blended properly
  7. For an extra edge, elevate your cocktail by rolling the rim in a combination of ground coffee beans and sugar to bind the whole drink together 

Queen Bee cocktail

Jinzu gin

Jinzu (Japan/Scotland): Scottish gin with a Japanese twist

Dee Davis has created Jinzu, a lovely gin. Inspired by a visit to Japan and a lifelong interest in flavour combinations, she’s managed to  create a classic British gin with an elegant and subtle Japanese twist. The resulting gin (named after a Japanese river surrounded by cherry blossom trees) is a subtle triumph.  Dee has managed to blend fragrant Japanese Sake with a traditional gin. 
This Scottish gin is built on a solid base of traditional Juniper (from Tuscany).  Dee then allows the citrus flavours of Yuzu lemon and a hint of cherry blossom in to the gin. And then she adds the magic ingredient, distilled Junmai sake from Japan. The result: an elegant, creamy and refreshing gin that hits just the right spot.

A winning combination

jinzu gin cherry blossomThis gorgeous fusion of East and West was developed by Dee after she won Diageo’s “Show Your Spirit” competition, way back in 2013.  Distilled in traditional copper stills it is an innovative gin, perfectly blended to reflect the characteristics of its dual heritage. 
At 41.3% ABV, this is strong enough to show its character but not so strong that you can’t keep sipping.
Delicate on the nose, you may smell oranges and coriander seeds with a long, lingering juniper finish, taking you on a sweet, spicy journey to the East.  This is a great gin if you’re thinking of rustling up a “Bee’s Knees” cocktail (recipe coming soon!). 
Plus, it comes in a beautiful bottle featuring a Japanese Mejiro bird under an iconic British umbrella and a beautiful branch from a cherry blossom tree. This image is designed to reflect the idea that this gin has its “head in Britain and its heart in Japan” and pays homage to the dual traditions of this exceptional drink.

Perfect serve:

  1. Take a large highball glass and fill it to the top with ice cubes (the bigger, the better!)
  2. Pour in 50ml of Jinzu gin, straight over the ice
  3. Fill to top with Fentimans premium tonic water (or Yuzu premium tonic water for a citrus lift)
  4. Garnish with a slice of apple poured into a highball glass full of cubed ice.
  5. Sit back and enjoy. Kampai!


Written by Steve (with a little help from Ruddles, the gin dog!)

Don’t forget to follow us on our facebook community page to join in the gin discussion.

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5 kinds of gin

5 kinds of gin: do you know the difference?

5 kinds of gin, really?

When most people think of gin, they think of England. It’s the classic, buttoned up English drink with hints of Empire, straw hats and times past.  But you couldn’t be more wrong. 
While it is true that the English adapted and popularised this juniper juice in the 18th century, its origins are not British at all, but Dutch.  Before it hit our shores, a drop of Dutch Courage (gin) was administered to calm the jagged nerves of those about to go into battle. The Brits liked this Jenever gin and wanted some for themselves.  But they altered forever the rich, almost smoky taste of the original by adapting the recipe. The result is what we now think of as traditional English gin styles, such as London Dry, Old Tom and Plymouth gin.  

The gin revolution begins

Now, fast forward to the 2010s, when the good people of Barcelona spotted a way of pumping up the style and invented the copa of gin (otherwise known as the Gin Tonic).  For the first time, gin and tonics were lovingly complemented with garnishes, herbs and exotic fruit to bring out the drink’s deeper aromas and flavours.  Once these gin pioneers had kick-started the gin revolution, small batch distillers and mixologists started to reappraise this extraordinary drink.
A decade later, there are more than 250 craft distilleries in the UK alone cranking out exceptional gins.  Craft distillers are pushing the boundaries of mixology further than ever.  Spain is not far behind with hundreds more dotted around the country. And Germany is a big player too. Even the Japanese are on the bandwagon! 

How many have you tried?

Genever gin

Genever ginThis is where it all began. Genever gin is the forerunner of modern gin. First heard of in 16th century Holland it is much maltier and more savoury than contemporary gins. This is due to the fact that it is distilled from malt wine spirits instead of neutral grain. It also works really well in a gin old-fashioned.  Originally, Genever was made by distilling malt to 50% ABV and then adding herbs to disguise the bitter taste, but it’s got much better since then. These days, there are two main types: Jonge Genever (Young Genever) has a neutral taste with a slight aroma of juniper and malt wine.  The second style is Oude Genever (Old Genever), aged in wood and with a maltier, smokier taste that is more reminiscent of whisky.

London Dry

London Dry ginContrary to popular opinion, London Dry gin doesn’t have to come from London. Or even the UK.  It is simply the name of a style that originated there in the aftermath of the genever wave. It is a very juniper forward style (as you would expect) and generally has citrus, angelica root and coriander as its other key flavours. Often bottled at high proof levels, this gin is great for cocktails, which is why it has become one of the most widely known gin styles on the planet.  This style became dominant and originally became known as Dry Gin to contrast it with its sweeter cousin, Old Tom.  London Dry gin has some additional rules to regular distilled gin.  It must be flavoured exclusively with distilled natural botanicals. No additional flavourings can be added after the distillation process.  In fact, nothing can be added except for neutral spirit, water and a maximum of 0.1 g of sugar per litre.

Old Tom

Old Tom ginA sweet style that developed in the 19th century this gin got its name from its secret history. In order to avoid paying taxes on gin, a certain Captain Dudley Bradstreet from London started selling bootleg gin. He advised people to look for it under the sign of the cat, where he had cleverly placed a lead pipe attached to a funnel on the inside. Customers would put money in the slot and he would dispatch their gin down the pipe directly into their glass, bottle (or even mouth!). Over time, the practice caught on and others started to change their door knockers or signs to feature an Old Tom Cat. Old Tom gin is a sweeter, maltier gin and is sometimes barrel-aged for flavour. It has become a classic ingredient for bartenders and mixologists around the world because it is such a versatile cocktail ingredient and features prominently in classic cocktails such as the Tom Collins.

Plymouth gin

Plymouth ginSmoother than its London relative this is generally produced in the south of England and is a lower strength gin than its big city neighbour. Juniper is less dominant in Plymouth gins, making it a great gin for drinking neat or in a Martini.  Plymouth gin can only be made at the Plymouth Gin Distillery in the beautiful South West of England and pops up frequently on bartenders shelves all over the world. It has a long history, dating back to that late 18th century.  It is the only gin to have its own geographical indication and is still made in the oldest operating gin distillery in the world.  This classic gin is still produced in an ancient still that has been operating for 150 years and it has a subtle, full-bodied flavour which avoids any bitter botanicals.  The result is a an earthy tasting gin with hints of orange and cardamom and a soft, smooth finish with a hint of spice. There are two versions of Plymouth gin – the original (41.2 ABV) and their Navy Strength version (which comes in at a hefty 57% ABV).

Contemporary gin

Contemporary gin The gin revolution that blew in earlier this decade has resulted in a contemporary international selection that could have only been imagined a decade ago. Now, contemporary gin makers are dispensing with tradition and experimenting with new flavours and techniques that are challenging everything we thought we knew about this traditional drink. From the UK to Spain and from Japan to Latin America there’s something for everyone – you are only limited by your imagination.



Written by Steve (with a little help from Ruddles, the gin dog!)

Don’t forget to follow us on our facebook community page to join in the gin discussion.


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happy new year with a gin punch

Adiós, 2020. This year, we’re getting punch drunk!

posted in: Cocktails, Gin and Juniper | 0

Congratulations. You are a survivor. You’ve just made it through one of the most challenging years in living memory and that in itself is quite an achievement. It’s been tough, many of us have not been so lucky. We’ve been separated from our families, isolated from our communities and normal life has been put on hold until this virus has been beaten. So, in a year where it doesn’t seem like we have a lot to celebrate, there is one thing we know we can raise a glass of gin punch to – the start of 2021!

Keeping your spirits up

And while we recognise that this New Year’s Eve will be a slightly more modest affair than usual and the big parties have been put on hold, there is still every reason to keep your spirits up with a few gin-based drinks. We’ve already introduced you to the delights of the Spanish 75 (a twist on the French 75 using cava instead of champagne for a smoother, better balanced drink).

Get the party going with a gin punch!

We also mentioned that we’d be sharing a gin punch recipe for New Year’s Eve that is easy to make, deceptively strong and gets the party off to a quick start. Plus, it has the added advantage of eliminating the need to constantly go back and make fresh drinks. Just make a big batch in advance and dip in whenever you need a refill. So, after some exhaustive research, here’s a really easy and delicious gin punch recipe that is guaranteed to get the party going. With only around 200 Kcals per glass, this recipe will serve 8 people and can be rustled up in as little as 10 minutes. It is fruity, spicy and strong and the gentle heat of the ginger beer along with the sweetness of the pomegranate gives it a lovely, warming winter feel – just right for New Year’s Eve.

Easy to make, easy to scale!

Plus, it can easily be scaled up by doubling (or tripling) the ingredients. All you need is a bigger bowl. We think this recipe lends itself to a Twisted Nose gin. This Hampshire-gin is distilled with the gentle warmth of locally grown watercress for a little extra peppery depth. We think this is the perfect way to dial up the flavour this New Year’s Eve – and we’re pretty sure that after a few of these, you’ll be dancing at midnight. Just make sure you’re socially distanced!!

Happy 2021, gin lovers – you deserve the best!

Gin punch recipe

Ingredients:

  • 400g of gin (Twisted Nose will work well with this)
  • 180ml Chambord (or raspberry liqueur)
  • 160ml pomegranate juice
  • 4tbsp ginger sugar syrup (from a jar of stem ginger)
  • Grated zest and juice of 2 limes (plus extra wedges)
  • 320ml (or more) to taste of chilled, peppery ginger beer (we recommend Fentimans or Fever Tree)

Method:

  • Half fill a punch bowl with ice.
  • Pour in the gin, Chambord, Pomegranate juice, ginger syrup and lime juice.
  • Then stir, before adding a few more lime wedges
  • Top up with ginger beer (add as much as you like to achieve your preferred taste)
  • Ladle the drink into 8 punch glasses or heavy tumblers
  • Make sure everyone gets loads of ice
  • Garnish with a lime zest
Gin punch



Written by Steve (with a little help from Ruddles, the gin dog!)

Don’t forget to follow us on our facebook community page to join in the gin discussion.


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