Gin nut

NUT gin: the clue is in the name!

We stumbled across a lovely little gin the other day. It’s from right here in Catalunya and frankly it was too good for us not to share.

Go nuts!

Introducing NUT gin, craft-distilled in the Emporda region of Catalunya nestled between the rugged drama of the Pyrenean mountains and the cooling breezes of the Mediterranean coast. This is an area that is sure to inspire you with its natural beauty. The guys at NUT have created a unique gin in the traditional London Dry style and have infused it with a special blend of locally grown fruits, flowers, herbs and Mediterranean spices. The result is a distinctive tasting gin that really stands out from the crowd. At 45% ABV, NUT gin doesn’t hold back on the alcohol, yet it still delivers a smooth tasting, unusual and delicious gin with a long, smooth orange finish.

Inspired by rugged beauty and local botanicals

Like most Catalans, the team at NUT have a deep respect for beauty and nature. The rich, productive soils here allow flora and fauna to both survive and thrive. So, what is it that makes this London Dry style gin so special?

Only the best ingredients

They only use the best base alcohol, distilled four times. They then infuse it with a delightful combination of locally sourced botanicals, which they macerate for a minimum of 24 hours. These include the required juniper, but also 12 others including coriander, cardamom, angelica root, lemon peel, orange peel, rosemary, thyme, olive leaves and licorice. Then it gets interesting. They’ve added some local ingredients that are not often found in gin and which give it a unique character. The clue is in the name. In a stroke of genius, the guys at NUT have added walnuts and bitter almonds.

Complex, smooth and just a little bit nutty…

So, what does this unusual gin actually taste of? Well, the first impressions on the nose are that it has an elegant intensity. There are strong notes of citrus (in a nod towards its Mediterranean origins). There is also a noticeable herbaceous element. This brings out the best of all the other spices just waiting to be released into your mouth. And finally, there is a smooth, long finish to this gin where you should pick up traces of orange peels for a bittersweet ending.

Good enough to drink alone

All in all this is a great value treat, delivering confidently on all its promises. In fact, this gin is so good that it actually tastes rather nice all on its own. Just pour a measure into a rocks glass over a large ice cube and add a twist of orange peel. And if you’d like even more Mediterranean adventure in your drink, simply swap the orange peel for a sprig of burned rosemary. You could even a little fig for added sweetness.

However, drinking gin neat is not necessarily to everyone’s taste. You’ll be relieved to know that this gin is outstanding in a Mediterranean style G&T and is a great gin if you’re looking to give your cocktails a unique twist.

The perfect pour

This is a Mediterranean gin and we think it should be served in the Mediterranean style. Take a large copa glass and fill it to the top with big ice cubes (the bigger, the better!) Pour in a decent slug of gin (you decide what that means!) Fill it up to the top with a high quality Indian tonic water such as 1724 or a subtly flavoured premium tonic such as Fevertree Mediterranenan. Add a garnish such as a cinammon stick or a fresh orange wedge to bring out the best of the botanicals. You could even add a pinch of nutmeg if you’re feeling really adventurous. Your reward will be a distinctive gin, packed with intense Mediterranean flavours. Take that first sip and prepare to be instantly whisked away to the beautiful heart of Catalunya.

Saludos!


Written by Steve (with a little help from Ruddles, the gin dog!)

Don’t forget to follow us on our facebook community page to join in the gin discussion.


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gin mule

Gin-Gin Mule: a gin cocktail with a kick!

posted in: Cocktails, Gin and Juniper | 0

Many of us will have heard of the legendary Moscow Mule.  It’s a classic cocktail and it’s been around forever.  It is a cocktail made with vodka, spicy ginger beer, and lime juice, garnished with a slice or wedge of lime.  The Moscow Mule is generally served in copper mugs and is one of the simplest and most delicious cocktails ever.
But what does all this have to do with gin, I hear you ask? Well, there is a special variation of this drink for gin lovers and, just like the city it was born in, it was so good, they named it twice.  It’s called (for obvious reasons), the Gin-Gin Mule.

The beautiful “love child” of a Moscow Mule and a Mojito

Invented in New York in the year 2000, this delicious drink is the beautiful love child of a Moscow Mule and a Mojito, so it has good genes! But this is more than just a change of booze.  The subtle difference is that it substitutes gin for vodka and adds the muddled mintiness of a Mojito to create a gorgeous taste and flavour combination that, in my opinion, far exceeds the beauty of its two elderly parents.
Just imagine this – a muddle of sugary mintiness at the bottom, offset by the spiciness and bubbles of a freshly opened bottle of ginger beer (we recommend Fentimans or Fever Tree) with a little citrus tartness to give it a refreshing edge and a big blast of a decent london dry gin such as Beefeater or Bombay Sapphire.

The serve

Traditionally, a Moscow Mule is served in a small, handbeaten  copper mug, but this drink works almost as well in a highball glass or a tumbler.  But the copper mug is better for sure. Not only does it look good but it adds a bit of novelty to your regular drinking approach.  And apparently, drinking from a cold copper mug maintains and even increases the bubbliness of the ginger beer, ensuring that your drink will be sparkling every time.  You can pick up a set of four of these beautiful, hand beaten copper mugs for less than £20 and guarantee that the sparkle will remain right up to the last drop.

The verdict

Wow, Gin-Gin Mule is a great drink and its parents should be proud.  No wonder this quickly became a contemporary classic when it was first introduced to customers at New York’s Pegu Club 20 years ago. Deliciously spicy and citrusy at the same time, the fresh, muddled mint takes it to another level altogether.  We cannot recommend this cocktail highly enough, but make sure you use freshly opened,  high quality ginger beer to make sure the fizz is truly fizzing!

Gin-Gin Mule recipe

Ingredients:

  • 4 mint sprigs
  • 1/2 oz of fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 oz of simple syrup
  • 2 oz gin (Bombay Sapphire)
  • 2 ounces of high quality ginger beer (Fever Tree or Fentimans)
  • Garnish with lime wedges and a sprig of mint

Method:

  1. Muddle the mint leaves in the bottom of the mug/glass using a wooden spoon
  2. Add the lime juice, simple syrup and gin
  3. Stir to combine
  4. Add ice and fill to top with ginger beer.
  5. Stir gently
  6. Wipe the rim of the glass with a lime wedge
  7. Garnish with lime and mint (or a slice of ginger root)

gin mule

Calories per serving: 177

smokey ice cubes

Smoky ice cubes: are they really a thing?

posted in: Cocktails, Gin and Juniper | 0

No smoke without fire?

Smoky ice cubes are indeed a thing. And they’re so easy to make. You could go all out and spend a day preparing a fire, smoking the wood and delicately infusing the ice. Or, you could simply buy a small bottle of liquid smoke and add a few drops to your ice cubes.  Bingo!

This little hack is a gift from us to you – we know you’re busy and who has the time to do this from scratch?  As the ice cubes inevitably melt, your drink becomes infused with a gentle smokiness that can enhance strong, complex cocktails such as a Negroni or a gin Old Fashioned. It’s a little magic trick that will impress your friends. For more inspiration, check out our free Top 10 gin bartending hacks.

Here is a great recipe that will draw out the smoky  flavour from the ice to really lift your cocktail out of the ordinary.

Ingredients:

  • 10-15 smoky ice cubes
  • 1 lime (cut into 8 wedges)
  • 90ml of gin (citrus gins work best)
  • Premium tonic water

Method:

  1. Squeeze the juice of two lime wedges per glass
  2. Fill the glass with the remaining lime wedges and fill to top with smokey ice cubes
  3. Add the gin and top up with tonic
  4. Garnish with  half of the thin lime slice and serve immediately

smokey ice cubes

Relax. Continued

Jinzu gin

Jinzu (Japan/Scotland): Scottish gin with a Japanese twist

Dee Davis has created Jinzu, a lovely gin. Inspired by a visit to Japan and a lifelong interest in flavour combinations, she’s managed to  create a classic British gin with an elegant and subtle Japanese twist. The resulting gin (named after a Japanese river surrounded by cherry blossom trees) is a subtle triumph.  Dee has managed to blend fragrant Japanese Sake with a traditional gin. 
This Scottish gin is built on a solid base of traditional Juniper (from Tuscany).  Dee then allows the citrus flavours of Yuzu lemon and a hint of cherry blossom in to the gin. And then she adds the magic ingredient, distilled Junmai sake from Japan. The result: an elegant, creamy and refreshing gin that hits just the right spot.

A winning combination

jinzu gin cherry blossomThis gorgeous fusion of East and West was developed by Dee after she won Diageo’s “Show Your Spirit” competition, way back in 2013.  Distilled in traditional copper stills it is an innovative gin, perfectly blended to reflect the characteristics of its dual heritage. 
At 41.3% ABV, this is strong enough to show its character but not so strong that you can’t keep sipping.
Delicate on the nose, you may smell oranges and coriander seeds with a long, lingering juniper finish, taking you on a sweet, spicy journey to the East.  This is a great gin if you’re thinking of rustling up a “Bee’s Knees” cocktail (recipe coming soon!). 
Plus, it comes in a beautiful bottle featuring a Japanese Mejiro bird under an iconic British umbrella and a beautiful branch from a cherry blossom tree. This image is designed to reflect the idea that this gin has its “head in Britain and its heart in Japan” and pays homage to the dual traditions of this exceptional drink.

Perfect serve:

  1. Take a large highball glass and fill it to the top with ice cubes (the bigger, the better!)
  2. Pour in 50ml of Jinzu gin, straight over the ice
  3. Fill to top with Fentimans premium tonic water (or Yuzu premium tonic water for a citrus lift)
  4. Garnish with a slice of apple poured into a highball glass full of cubed ice.
  5. Sit back and enjoy. Kampai!


Written by Steve (with a little help from Ruddles, the gin dog!)

Don’t forget to follow us on our facebook community page to join in the gin discussion.

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