5 types of gin: do you know the difference?

posted in: Gintriguing facts | 2

Gin is gin. But is it?

We all love gin – that’s why we’re here. But do we know what gin really is? Can we spot the difference between London Dry and Old Tom? How many types of gin are there? Do we know why you don’t add tonic to a Genever? Probably not.

So here’s a simple guide to the 5 most important types of gin.

Try them all, figure out your own personal gin style – and stock your cupboard accordingly. After all, where gin is concerned, variety is the spice of life…

Gin

The humble gin starts its journey as a neutral spirit, distilled from anything you like: grain, potatoes, milk, apples…

But to be classified as a gin, the resulting liquid has to have a juniper flavour and juniper must be the predominant taste. It must also have a minimum ABV of 37.5% (40% in the US). So, in theory, you could simply pop down to your local shop, pull a bottle of vodka from the shelf, add a handful of juniper berries and “Hey Presto!”

Within a few hours, you’ll have turned it into gin.

Once you have the base in place, you can have some fun – add some flavourings, infuse it with berries, add some spice – and start sipping. Or you could stay “old school” and simply pour it over some ice add some tonic and drink away. Your call…

Distilled gin

This starts off as above, but with one important difference  – it has to be made using distilled botanicals.

The juniper-based gin needs to be “re-distilled” with those carefully chosen botanicals to become a neutral spirit of at least 96% ABV (and water).

Distilled gin is increasingly popular around the world, especially in the boutique distillery movement and includes well known brands such as Martin Miller’s and Hendricks (paid links) who include more  flavours once the distillation process is done.

London Dry gin

London Dry gin can be made anywhere in the world – it’s a style, not a geographical location.

London Dry follows the same basic rules as a distilled gin (see above) but it must only be flavoured with distilled natural botanicals.

Once the distillation process is over, that’s it. No further flavourings can be added after the distillation process except for neutral spirit, water and a maximum of 0.1g of sugar per litre. Popular brands include Beefeater, Tanqueray, Bombay Sapphire (paid links).

Old Tom gin

The precursor to London Dry gin, it’s the oldest style of English gin still produced today: Old Tom.

Old Tom has no rules imposed on it by the EU or any other regulatory body, so it can vary widely in its tastes and flavours, but it is sweeter than some of its more well known rivals and makes itself very amenable to cocktails.

It is still the favourite of bartenders around the world, who like its infinite variations and who respect its pedigree as one of the oldest forms of gin still being made. Old Tom is the staple ingredient of some amazing cocktails that go back as far as 100 years. It was out of fashion for a while, but it’s on a comeback as part of the gin revival and is now being made by small batch producers and big brands alike.

Always good to keep a bottle of this in your cocktail cabinet. Some of the more successful brands of Old Tom include: Hayman’s Old Tom (40% ABV) and Jensen’s Old Tom (43% ABV) (paid links).

For more information about the fascinating history of Old Tom gin, read our blog post here.

Genever gin

Genever gin: the grandaddy of them all.

Way before gin became associated with England, the Dutch created the original juniper based spirit.

Also known as Jenever gin, Ginebra gin or Dutch gin, it must be produced in the Netherlands, Belgium or certain parts of France and Germany.

There are two main types: Jonge Genever and Oude Genever.

Jonge Genever is closest to London Dry and is made from neutral spirit and juniper with additional flavourings as desired. It can contain up to 10g of sugar and up to 15% of malt wine. Oude Genever should be made with malt wine, juniper and other botanical flavourings as well as neutral spirits. Sometimes it is matured in casks to provide colour and flavour.

Flagship brands include Bols and Genevieve Genever Gin..

What’s your favourite type of gin and why?


Written by Steve (with a little help from Ruddles, the gin dog!)

Don’t forget to follow us on our facebook community page to join in the gin discussion.


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posted in: Gintriguing facts | 0

Gin has been around in different forms for a long time – but how much do you know of the history of your favourite drink?

How did gin change the world? Do you know which famous people liked a good G&T? And why did cats dispense gin to Londoners in the 18th century? Or,  why was gin known as “mother’s ruin”?

All will be revealed in our regular Gin-triguing facts segment – updated every month with quirky and totally irrelevant Gin-formation that you can impress your friends with.

Gin dispensed by cats

When Captain Dudley Bradstreet wanted to avoid paying excessive taxes on his gin sales in 18th century London, he came up with a cunning plan. He nailed a wooden sign to his door in the shape of a cat with a little pipe hidden inside its paw. When customers put a coin inside the cat’s mouth, Captain Dudley would return the favour by pouring gin down the pipe directly into their outstretched cup. This became known as Old Tom gin after the Tomcat sign from whence it came.

Old Tom style gin is now back in fashion with its sweeter taste making it perfect for light and refreshing cocktails – so much so that the Dorchester Hotel in London recently commissioned its own unique Old Tom Gin especially for its signature cocktails including its most recent creation, a delicious Coriander and Lemongrass concoction whipped up by head bartender Giuliano Morandin.

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Written by Steve (with a little help from Ruddles, the gin dog!)

Don’t forget to follow us on our facebook community page to join in the gin discussion.


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  • Glasgow’s Gin Spa: the ultimate indulgence
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